Bueller, Bueller, Anyone…

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We get asked all the time: “How do I get people to participate in my meetings?”

What happens when you ask a question and get blank stares?

Here’s the fix:

  1. Set the ground rules at the beginning of the meeting. “I’ll be asking each of you for your thoughts and feedback on this new process.”

  2. Follow through. In person, call on people around the room one by one. If the meeting is virtual, tell them you’ll be calling on them in alphabetical or geographical order. 

  3. If you’re looking for feedback on many things during the meeting, let them know they can take one pass. That means, call on everyone- but if they’ve got nothin’- let them pass.

Be clear about your goals, be clear about your ground rules!

Think your team could benefit from Leading Effective Meetings Training? Click here to check it out.

I just flew in...

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…and boy are my arms tired.

When your team shows up for a meeting, chances are they’re thinking about their to-do lists, emails, projects, last night’s America’s Greatest … show.  Point is, they are distracted. 

Solution: Get them focused with an attention grabber, called a hook

Maybe it’s a joke, statistic, powerful statement, or a question - anything that gets them thinking will do.

Bonus points if you listen to their answers!

Have a great meeting,
Team Ward Certified

P.S.- Think your team could benefit from Leading Effective Meetings Training? Click here to check it out.

Who else is going?

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Just like a good party, the guest list of a meeting is critical.

A surefire way to waste time in a meeting is to invite the wrong people.

The people on the invite list should have one or more of the following:

  • Something to contribute

  • Something to learn

  • A stake in the outcome

  • Follow-up responsibilities

  • Decision-making responsibilities

Don’t just invite the same old CC group list. Craft your attendee list with purpose.

Think your team could benefit from Leading Effective Meetings Training? Click here to check it out.

What are we talking about?

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As the leader of the meeting, you know what you want to accomplish and how you’d like to accomplish it. But do your attendees know the plan?   

Different team members have different needs, an agenda created and distributed in advance can meet most of those needs and help you have a more productive meeting.

Aim to answer these four questions:

What – What are we discussing?

Why – Why are we discussing or considering it?

Who – Who will be responsible, and who will be impacted?

How – How will we accomplish our goals?

Tip: Make this the norm for formatting in all of your meeting invites, to set a standard for anyone on your team to be clear in advance when setting up meetings of their own.

Think your team could benefit from Leading Effective Meetings Training? Click here to check it out.

What's the Point?

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Consider the last meeting you attended. Did you:

  1. Show up late?

  2. Leave early?

  3. Bring in work or spend the time checking your phone?

We’ve all been to (and maybe even led some) bad meetings.

One way to improve a meeting is to have a clear goal. Do that first, and you may discover you don’t need the meeting at all. Perhaps a well written email will do the trick.

Share that clear goal so that attendees can show up prepared and in the right mindset.

Think your team could benefit from our Leading Effective Meetings Training? Click here to check it out.

Smile, Breathe, and Meet on. You got this!

Let's give 'em something to talk about

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Ask your team who their favorite companies are and why. Maybe it’s the one that gives frequent updates, or treats them like family.  Or the one that checks up on their mental well being every so often. (Yes, Netflix, I’m still watching. Thank you for the reminder that it’s been four hours since I last moved.)

Now for the plot twist: ask what they think their own customers would say about them and your company.  

Are you giving them something (good) to talk about? How do you want to be remembered, and how can you take a cue from some of your favorites? 

What’s the coolest thing they shared?  Let us know at ann@wardcertified.com!